Gift for Infinity: vote for energy transition

Until the 30th of September, our pitch for research addressing success factors in the energy transition is featured in a short video on www.RUG400.nl.

We are very pleased that in the context of the 400th anniversary of the University of Groningen, and in particular, in the campaign ‘Gift for Infinity’, members of the public have put forth issues that are at the core of EnergySense.

By visiting this site, you can see the videos and vote for the research that will be sponsored in the course of the anniversary funding campaign. A nice opportunity to show and reinforce this line of work.

Researcher on the Roof

Researcher on the Roof

In the framework of the 400th anniversary of the University of Groningen, the public was asked to send in questions to the university. Several of these dealt with energy and sustainability, and together with some members of the public, a video was made to highlight the importance of these questions.

From Monday 2 September, the videos will be visible and you can all vote for the best research pitch. The winning topic will be the recipient of a funding campaign and be able to pursue the proposed research.

Navigating the brain

This Saturday, Sarah de Rijcke and I met up with artist and researchers Jordi Puig. We visited an exhibition data.scan [no 1-9] by Japanese artist Ryoji Ikeda at Gallery MU. A fabulous, immersive exhibition about data, in which multiple visualisations accompanied by sounds are juxtaposed, contrasted and combined. But the main reason for meeting up was to visit Jordi’s installation at STRP.nl festival. The work he presented is part of Picturing the Brain: Perspectives on Neuroimaging.

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Doing and thinking!

A new publication with a long history! Learning in a Landscape: Simulation-building as Reflexive Intervention–the title says it all. After sending in this article to a few possible outlets, it seemed we might never get out of the binary reactions that wouldn’t give room the particular combination of building and reflecting going on in this article. We would receive feedback along the lines of  ‘get the long-winded talk about how hard it was and tell what you did’ (generally from simulation-builders) or else we would be taken to task for investing in simulation as a social science tool and for not choosing a role and sticking to it (from STS reviewers).

It was also a pretty difficult article to write, in terms of actually aligning words and finding the right constructions to maintain some coherence in the piece while also doing justice to the different standpoints and phases, and hammering out a ‘voice’ that could do all this. So after more rejections than seemed fair (did you know that your manuscript can be accepted by reviewers but then vetoed by an editor?!!!), we published a version of this piece on Arxiv. ‘We’ being the wonderful Andrea Scharnhorst and Matt Ratto and me.

This combination of doing and thinking was at the very heart of the Virtual Knowledge Studio, so it’s especially meaningful that it has finally been accepted in this great special issue. And this of course brings new hope for further interaction through this piece of writing. Thanks for reading!

Book cover, Social Software and the Evolution of User Expertise

In the words of editor Tatjana Takseva: It is a pleasure to let you know that the collection Social Software and the Evolution of User Expertise: Future Trends in Knowledge Creation and Dissemination has been published.

It contains a chapter written with Karina van Dalen-Oskam and Joris van Zundert: Between tradition and web 2.0: eLaborate as social experiment in humanities scholarship.

There is also a chapter by University of Amsterdam colleague Jose van Dijck, Google Scholar as the Co-Producer of Scholarly Knowledge, which I’m also very much looking forward to reading.

PhD Defense in Sweden

photoIt was a real pleasure to serve as opponent at the defense of Veronica Johansson of the University of Boras, Sweden. We had a great discussion about ethnographic methods and about the concept of critical literacy. And as always, it was wonderful to see everyone rejoice at the new Dr’s great accomplishment.

The full work entitled ‘A time and place for everything: social visualisation tools and critical literacies’ and a summary can be found here.

In a week!

Virtual Knowledge is now available from MIT Press!

Getting ready for “Images and Visualisation: Imaging Technology, Truth and Trust”

ImageIn a couple of days, I’ll be heading off to Norrkoping, Sweden for a summer school on visualisation. My talk will address two conventions found across many imaging modalities area fields: the view form nowhere and the seamless zoom. The presentation will be posted here, once I’ve finished tweaking it today. Among others, my visual argument will take up the book Zoom by Istvan Banyai and the short film Powers of Ten. An interesting variation that predates the Eames and Eames production is Cosmic Zoom, (1968) of the NFB of Canada.

–>PRESENTATION is available here: text of talk and slides

The Neuroscientific Turn!

A wonderful collection edited by Melissa M. Littlefield and Jenell M. Johnson. My contribution is entitled Fast Moving Objects and their Consequences. More information about the collection can be found on the Michigan Press website.

Social Technology

Our special issue on ‘social technology’ has now appeared!  It is the issue of April 2012 (22(2)) of the Journal Theory and Psychology. Please contact the editors for more information: Anne Beaulieu, Maarten Derksen, and Signe Vikkelsø.

The introduction to the special issue is entitled ‘Social technologies: Cross-disciplinary reflections on technologies in and from the social sciences‘ Theory & Psychology April 2012 22: 139-147, doi:10.1177/0959354311427593.